Psoriasis

Psoriasis and COVID 19

  

1. J Dermatolog Treat. 2020 May 2:1-6. doi: 10.1080/09546634.2020.1764904. [Epub

ahead of print] 

A challenging case of psoriasis flare-up after COVID-19 infection.

Nasiri S(1)(2), Araghi F(1), Tabary M(3), Gheisari M(1)(2), Mahboubi-Fooladi

Z(4), Dadkhahfar S(1).

Author information: 

(1)Skin Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 

Iran.

(2)Department of Dermatology, Loghman Hakim Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University 

of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

(3)Experimental Medicine Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 

Tehran, Iran.

(4)Department of Radiology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences,

Tehran, Iran.

The immunosuppressive drugs used for the treatment of psoriasis may affect the

clinical presentation and outcome of COVID-19 infection. Herein, we report a

73-year-old male patient with severe psoriasis being treated with cyclosporine

(CsA) 100mg daily plus methotrexate (MTX) 7.5 mg weekly (biologic treatment was

not accessible) who experienced disease flare-up after the discontinuation of

psoriasis treatment during COVID-19 infection.

DOI: 10.1080/09546634.2020.1764904 

PMID: 32363967 

2. Dermatol Ther. 2020 May 1:e13491. doi: 10.1111/dth.13491. [Epub ahead of print]

Comment on "Antipsoriatic treatments during COVID-19 outbreak".

Abdelmaksoud A(1), Goldust M(2)(3)(4), Vestita M(5)(6).

Author information: 

(1)Mansoura Dermatology, Venerology and Leprology, Hospital, Mansoura, Egypt.

(2)Department of Dermatology, University of Rome G. Marconi, Rome, Italy.

(3)Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany.

(4)Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

(5)Unit of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Emergency and Organ 

Transplantation, University of Bari, Italy.

(6)Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical

School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

DOI: 10.1111/dth.13491 

PMID: 32358882 

3. Dermatol Ther. 2020 May 1:e13490. doi: 10.1111/dth.13490. [Epub ahead of print]

Biologic therapy for psoriasis during the COVID-19 outbreak: the choice is to

weigh risks and benefits.

Conforti C(1), Giuffrida R(2), Dianzani C(3), Di Meo N(1), Zalaudek I(1).

Author information: 

(1)Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Dermatology Clinic, Maggiore

Hospital, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy.

(2)Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Dermatology,

University of Messina, Messina, Italy.

(3)Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Cosmetic Surgery, Dermatology

Section, Campus Bio-Medico University Hospital, Rome, Italy.

DOI: 10.1111/dth.13490 

PMID: 32358864 

4. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2020 May 2. doi: 10.1111/jdv.16571. [Epub ahead of 

print]

SARS-CoV-2 infection in a psoriatic patient treated with IL-23 inhibitor.

Balestri R(1), Rech G(1), Girardelli CR(1).

Author information: 

(1)Division of Dermatology, Psoriasis Outpatient Service, Santa Chiara Hospital, 

Trento, Italy.

we read with great interest the article entitled "SARS-CoV-2 infection in a

psoriatic patient treated with IL-23 inhibitor" published by Messina F. and

Piaserico S. in the JEADV.1 This is the first report of COronaVIrus DIsease 2019 

(COVID-19) in a psoriatic patient treated with a biologic. Whilst the authors

reported an infection that occurred during therapy with an IL-23 inhibitor, we

would like to briefly report one that occurred during therapy with an IL-17

inhibitor.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

DOI: 10.1111/jdv.16571 

PMID: 32358791 

5. Br J Dermatol. 2020 Apr 29. doi: 10.1111/bjd.19161. [Epub ahead of print]

Global reporting of cases of COVID-19 in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis: an

opportunity to inform care during a pandemic.

Mahil SK(1), Yiu ZZN(2), Mason KJ(2), Dand N(3), Coker B(4), Wall D(5)(6),

Fletcher G(6), Bosma A(7), Capon F(3), Iversen L(8), Langan SM(1)(9), Di Meglio

P(3), Musters A(7), Prieto-Merino D(9), Tsakok T(1), Warren RB(2), Flohr C(1),

Spuls P(7), Griffiths CEM(2), Barker J(1), Irvine AD(10), Smith CH(1); Secure-AD,

PsoPROTECT study groups.

Author information: 

(1)St John's Institute of Dermatology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust,

London, SE1 9RT, UK.

(2)Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, The University of

Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, NIHR Manchester Biomedical

Research Centre, Manchester, M13 9PT, UK.

(3)Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, School of Basic & Medical

Biosciences, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine, King's College London, London, 

UK.

(4)NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, 

London, SE1 9RT, UK.

(5)Hair Restoration Blackrock, Dublin, Ireland.

(6)National and International Skin Registry Solutions (NISR), Charles Institute

of Dermatology, Dublin, Ireland.

(7)Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam Public Health, Infection and Immunity,

UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

(8)Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C, Denmark.

(9)Faculty of Epidemiology, and Population Health, London , School of Hygiene and

Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

(10)St. James's Hospital, James's Street, Dublin, Ireland.

We wish to bring your attention to the PsoPROTECT (Psoriasis Patient Registry for

Outcomes, Therapy and Epidemiology of Covid-19 infecTion) and SECURE-AD

(Surveillance Epidemiology of Coronavirus Under Research Exclusion-Atopic

Dermatitis) registries; two urgent global initiatives that address an unmet need 

for delineating the determinants of COVID-19 outcomes in the common cutaneous

immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

DOI: 10.1111/bjd.19161 

PMID: 32348554 

6. Br J Dermatol. 2020 Apr 28. doi: 10.1111/bjd.19158. [Epub ahead of print]

The impact of COVID-19 pandemic on patients with chronic plaque psoriasis being

treated with biologic therapy: the Northern Italy experience.

Gisondi P(1), Facheris P(2)(3), Dapavo P(4), Piaserico S(5), Conti A(6), Naldi

L(7)(8), Cazzaniga S(8)(9), Malagoli P(10), Costanzo A(2).

Author information: 

(1)Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, University of 

Verona, Verona, Italy.

(2)Dermatology Unit, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University,

Pieve Emanuele, Italy.

(3)Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, IRCCS, Rozzano, Italy.

(4)Department of Biomedical Science and Human Oncology, Second Dermatologic

Clinic, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.

(5)Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padova,

Italy.

(6)Department of Surgical, Medical, Dental and Morphological Sciences related to 

Transplant, Oncology and Regenerative Medicine, Dermatology Unit, University of

Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.

(7)Department of Dermatology, San Bortolo Hospital, Vicenza, Italy.

(8)Centro Studi GISED, Bergamo, Italy.

(9)Department of Dermatology, Inselspital University Hospital of Bern, Bern,

Switzerland.

(10)Dermatology Unit Azienda Ospedaliera San Donato Milanese, Milan, Italy.

The "severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2" (SARS-CoV-2) has spread

over the four continents, causing the respiratory manifestations of Coronavirus

disease-19 (COVID-19) and satisfying the epidemiological criteria for a pandemic 

[1]. As of April 1, 2020, more than one million COVID-19 positive cases have been

identified and more than 54,000 deaths have occurred worldwide [2]. In Italy,

110,574 positive cases, 49,285 hospitalized patients and 13,155 deaths out of a

population of 60,359,546 inhabitants, have been reported, respectively [3]. The

highest number of deaths occurred in the northern Italian regions, i.e. Lombardy,

Emilia-Romagna, Veneto and Piedmont [3].

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

DOI: 10.1111/bjd.19158 

PMID: 32343839 

7. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2020 Apr 21. pii: S0190-9622(20)30701-5. doi:

10.1016/j.jaad.2020.04.085. [Epub ahead of print]

Risk of hospitalization and death from COVID-19 infection in patients with

chronic plaque psoriasis receiving a biological treatment and renal transplanted 

recipients in maintenance immunosuppressive treatment.

Gisondi P(1), Zaza G(2), Del Giglio M(3), Rossi M(2), Iacono V(2), Girolomoni

G(3).

Author information: 

(1)Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology. Electronic

address: paolo.gisondi@univr.it.

(2)Section of Nephrology, University of Verona, Italy.

(3)Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology.

DOI: 10.1016/j.jaad.2020.04.085 

PMCID: PMC7194926

PMID: 32330632 

8. Dermatol Ther. 2020 Apr 20. doi: 10.1111/dth.13434. [Epub ahead of print]

COVID-19 and psoriasis : should we fear for patients treated with biologics?

Amerio P(1), Prignano F(2), Giuliani F(1), Gualdi G(1).

Author information: 

(1)Clinic of Dermatology, Department of Medicine and Aging Sciences, University

G. D'Annunzio, Chieti, Italy.

(2)Section of Dermatology, Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence,

Florence, Italy.

The new coronavirus pandemic poses question and challenges for dermatologists.

One of question is if psoriasis patients treated with immunomodulating and

immunosuppressive drugs have to discontinue their treatment in the midts of fears

for the infection and its consequences. One of the challenges is how can we

support our patients in this critical time. Previous coronaviruses outbreaks

reports, current published evidences on pathogenesis and on clinical reports of

COVID infection in immunosuppressed patients are used to make a scientifically

based decision. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

DOI: 10.1111/dth.13434 

PMID: 32314483 

9. Dermatol Ther. 2020 Apr 18:e13433. doi: 10.1111/dth.13433. [Epub ahead of print]

Successful guselkumab treatment in a psoriatic patient affected with Cornelia de 

Lange syndrome, and prosecution during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Mugheddu C(1), Dell'Antonia M(1), Sanna S(1), Agosta D(1), Atzori L(1),

Rongioletti F(1).

Author information: 

(1)Dermatology Clinic, Department of Medical Sciences and Public Health,

University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.

Psychomotor delay and intellectual disability are potential limitations in

psoriasis management, due to low compliance, and strict dependence from

caregivers intervention. We report our successful experience with a 58-year-old

woman, who was genetically affected by Cornelia De Lange syndrome, which causes

intellectual disability and psychomotor disorders. The patient had been already

treated with topical and traditional therapies, without any clinical benefits.

Eventually, she adhered to guselkumab treatment. The compliance was excellent,

significant improvements were observed after only 3 months of treatment, without 

adverse effects. During follow-up, the COVID-19 pandemic address concern on the

possible increased risk of infection due to immunosuppression. In agreement with 

current Italian recommendations, risk and benefits profile was discussed with the

patient's legal tutor and the decision to continue the treatment was taken.

Psoriasis complete clarification was maintained during the most difficult period 

of the Italian outbreak, allowing the patient to remain safely at home.

© 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC.

DOI: 10.1111/dth.13433 

PMID: 32306513 

10. Dermatol Ther (Heidelb). 2020 Apr 16:1-11. doi: 10.1007/s13555-020-00377-9. [Epub

ahead of print]

Novel Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) and Biologic Therapy in Psoriasis: Infection

Risk and Patient Counseling in Uncertain Times.

Brownstone ND(1), Thibodeaux QG(1), Reddy VD(1), Myers BA(1), Chan SY(1), Bhutani

T(1), Liao W(1).

Author information: 

(1)Department of Dermatology, Psoriasis and Skin Treatment Center, University of 

California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA USA.

With the emergence of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) viral pandemic,

there is uncertainty whether biologic agents for psoriasis may place patients at 

a higher risk for infection or more severe disease course. This commentary offers

patient counseling recommendations based on the current available evidence. While

there are currently no specific data for psoriasis biologics and COVID-19, data

are presented here from phase III clinical trials of psoriasis biologics on rates

of upper respiratory infection, influenza, and serious infection. Overall these

data reveal that on the whole, psoriasis biologics do not show major increases in

infection risk compared to placebo during the course of these trials. However, as

the COVID-19 virus is a novel pathogen that is associated with mortality in a

subset of patients, a cautious approach is warranted. We discuss factors that may

alter the benefit-risk ratio of biologic use during this time of COVID-19

outbreak. Ultimately, treatment decisions should be made on the basis of dialogue

between patient and provider, considering each patient's individualized

situation. Once this pandemic has passed, it is only a matter of time before a

new viral disease reignites the same issues discussed here.

© The Author(s) 2020.

DOI: 10.1007/s13555-020-00377-9 

PMCID: PMC7160052

PMID: 32300516 

11. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2020 Apr 10. pii: S0190-9622(20)30543-0. doi:

10.1016/j.jaad.2020.04.004. [Epub ahead of print]

Biologics for psoriasis during COVID-19 outbreak.

Di Lernia V(1).

Author information: 

(1)Dermatology Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Azienda USL-IRCCS di Reggio

Emilia. Electronic address: vito.dilernia@ausl.re.it.

DOI: 10.1016/j.jaad.2020.04.004 

PMCID: PMC7146699

PMID: 32283234 

12. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2020 Apr 10. doi: 10.1007/s40257-020-00514-2. [Epub ahead of 

print]

Managing Cutaneous Immune-Mediated Diseases During the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Torres T(1)(2), Puig L(3).

Author information: 

(1)Department of Dermatology, Centro Hospitalar Universitário Do Porto, Porto,

Portugal. torres.tiago@outlook.com.

(2)Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar, University of Porto, Porto,

Portugal. torres.tiago@outlook.com.

(3)Department of Dermatology, Hospital de La Santa Creu I Sant Pau, Barcelona,

Spain.

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a clinical syndrome caused by a novel

coronavirus called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). 

COVID-19 has spread rapidly worldwide and has been shown to have a wide spectrum 

of severity. COVID-19 has become a public health emergency of relevant

international concern, and it was declared a pandemic by the World Health

Organization on 11 March, 2020. SARS-CoV-2 infection in severe cases involves the

host response as an important contributor to the disease process and tissue

damage, mainly due to dysregulated and excessive innate immune responses. The

primary immune response leads to viral clearance in the majority of cases.

However, in a subgroup of patients, the secondary immune response may be

exaggerated, leading to inflammatory-induced lung injury and other complications 

including pneumonitis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, respiratory failure, 

shock, organ failure, and potentially death. Several cutaneous immune-mediated

diseases, including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and hidradenitis suppurativa,

are therapeutically managed with biologic and non-biologic immunosuppressive and 

immunomodulatory drugs. The outbreak of COVID-19 affects the management of these 

chronic conditions, not only for those who are already receiving treatment but

also for those who are about to start a new treatment to control their disease.

In this article, the management of cutaneous immune-mediated diseases during the 

COVID-19 pandemic is discussed.

DOI: 10.1007/s40257-020-00514-2 

PMID: 32277351 

13. J Dermatolog Treat. 2020 Apr 6:1-2. doi: 10.1080/09546634.2020.1749545. [Epub

ahead of print]

Biologic therapy for psoriasis during the covid-19 outbreak is not a choice.

Bardazzi F(1), Loi C(1), Sacchelli L(1), Di Altobrando A(1).

Author information: 

(1)Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of

Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

DOI: 10.1080/09546634.2020.1749545 

PMID: 32248724 

14. Dermatol Ther. 2020 Apr 1:e13360. doi: 10.1111/dth.13360. [Epub ahead of print]

Comment on "COVID-19 and psoriasis: Is it time to limit treatment with

immunosuppressants? A call for action".

Abdelmaksoud A(1), Goldust M(2)(3)(4), Vestita M(5)(6).

Author information: 

(1)Mansoura Dermatology, Venerology and Leprology Hospital, Mansoura, Egypt.

(2)Department of Dermatology, University of Rome G. Marconi, Rome, Italy.

(3)Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany.

(4)Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

(5)Unit of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Emergency and Organ 

Transplantation, University of Bari, Bari, Italy.

(6)Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical

School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

DOI: 10.1111/dth.13360 

PMID: 32239587 

15. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2020 May;82(5):1217-1218. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2020.03.031.

Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Should biologics for psoriasis be interrupted in the era of COVID-19?

Lebwohl M(1), Rivera-Oyola R(2), Murrell DF(3).

Author information: 

(1)Icahn School of Medicine at Mt Sinai Hospital, New York, New York.

(2)Icahn School of Medicine at Mt Sinai Hospital, New York, New York. Electronic 

address: ryan.riveraoyola@mountsinai.org.

(3)St. George Hospital, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Comment in

J Am Acad Dermatol. 2020 May;82(5):e173-e175.

DOI: 10.1016/j.jaad.2020.03.031 

PMCID: PMC7156810

PMID: 32199889 [Indexed for MEDLINE]

16. Dermatol Ther. 2020 Mar 11:e13298. doi: 10.1111/dth.13298. [Epub ahead of print]

COVID-19 and psoriasis: Is it time to limit treatment with immunosuppressants? A 

call for action.

Conforti C(1), Giuffrida R(2), Dianzani C(3), Di Meo N(1), Zalaudek I(1).

Author information: 

(1)Dermatology Clinic, Maggiore Hospital, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy.

(2)Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology, University of

Messina, Messina, Italy.

(3)Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Cosmetic Surgery, Dermatology

Section, Campus Bio-Medico University Hospital, Rome, Italy.

DOI: 10.1111/dth.13298 

PMID: 32157783 

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